Adventurings

The ARCHIVE of all my past adventures (and there are many!) can be accessed at the bottom of the page.
Mon Sep 2
Fireworks over the Charles River, seen from a cruise boat. 

Fireworks over the Charles River, seen from a cruise boat. 

Comments (View)
Newfield, New Jersey. 

Newfield, New Jersey. 

Comments (View)
Tickets to ride at the Wonderland Pier in Ocean City, NJ. 

Tickets to ride at the Wonderland Pier in Ocean City, NJ. 

Comments (View)
Sat May 25
Comments (View)
Tue Apr 30
Comments (View)
Sat Apr 27
Comments (View)
Tue Oct 23
Comments (View)
Tue Mar 13
theatlantic:

6 Writing Tips From John Steinbeck

1. Abandon the idea that you are ever going to finish. Lose track of the 400 pages and write just one page for each day, it helps. Then when it gets finished, you are always surprised.
2. Write freely and as rapidly as possible and throw the whole thing on paper. Never correct or rewrite until the whole thing is down. Rewrite in process is usually found to be an excuse for not going on. It also interferes with flow and rhythm which can only come from a kind of unconscious association with the material.
3. Forget your generalized audience. In the first place, the nameless, faceless audience will scare you to death and in the second place, unlike the theater, it doesn’t exist. In writing, your audience is one single reader. I have found that sometimes it helps to pick out one person—a real person you know, or an imagined person and write to that one.
4. If a scene or a section gets the better of you and you still think you want it—bypass it and go on. When you have finished the whole you can come back to it and then you may find that the reason it gave trouble is because it didn’t belong there.
5. Beware of a scene that becomes too dear to you, dearer than the rest. It will usually be found that it is out of drawing.
6. If you are using dialogue—say it aloud as you write it. Only then will it have the sound of speech.
Read more. [Image: AP]

theatlantic:

6 Writing Tips From John Steinbeck

1. Abandon the idea that you are ever going to finish. Lose track of the 400 pages and write just one page for each day, it helps. Then when it gets finished, you are always surprised.

2. Write freely and as rapidly as possible and throw the whole thing on paper. Never correct or rewrite until the whole thing is down. Rewrite in process is usually found to be an excuse for not going on. It also interferes with flow and rhythm which can only come from a kind of unconscious association with the material.

3. Forget your generalized audience. In the first place, the nameless, faceless audience will scare you to death and in the second place, unlike the theater, it doesn’t exist. In writing, your audience is one single reader. I have found that sometimes it helps to pick out one person—a real person you know, or an imagined person and write to that one.

4. If a scene or a section gets the better of you and you still think you want it—bypass it and go on. When you have finished the whole you can come back to it and then you may find that the reason it gave trouble is because it didn’t belong there.

5. Beware of a scene that becomes too dear to you, dearer than the rest. It will usually be found that it is out of drawing.

6. If you are using dialogue—say it aloud as you write it. Only then will it have the sound of speech.

Read more. [Image: AP]

Comments (View)
Sat Jan 7
slaughterhouse90210:

“But nothing disturbs the feeling of specialness like the presence of other human beings feeling identically special.”― Jonathan Franzen, Freedom 

slaughterhouse90210:

“But nothing disturbs the feeling of specialness like the presence of other human beings feeling identically special.”
Jonathan Franzen, Freedom 

Comments (View)
Tue Nov 22

(via newsweek)

Comments (View)
Sat Nov 12

theatlanticvideo:

A Montage of Astronauts Falling on the Moon

YouTube user SaturnApollo has compiled a blooper reel of astronauts tripping over Moon rocks and generally struggling to stay vertical, even though the Moon’s gravity is only about one-sixth as strong as Earth’s.

Via the Daily What.

(via theatlantic)

Comments (View)
Mon Sep 26
theatlantic:

One Downside to Bicycle Commuting: Biker’s Lung

If you bike to work, you’ve probably got pretty nice thighs. Your lungs, though, may not be in such great shape.
New research has found that bicycle commuters inhale more than twice the amount of black carbon particles as pedestrians making a comparable trip. That healthy bike ride to and from work might be getting you out of a car, but it’s not getting you out of the way of the automobile emissions.
The study, led by Professor Jonathan Grigg from Barts and the London School of Medicine, looked at bicycle and pedestrian commuters in London to determine whether different modes of travel exposed commuters to higher levels of black carbon. By comparing levels of carbon in the lungs of five healthy bicycle commuters to the levels of five healthy pedestrian commuters, the researchers found a large disparity. The bicycle commuters had 2.3 times more black carbon in their lungs. They claim that the probability of this happening by chance is less than one percent.

Read more at The Atlantic Cities

theatlantic:

One Downside to Bicycle Commuting: Biker’s Lung

If you bike to work, you’ve probably got pretty nice thighs. Your lungs, though, may not be in such great shape.

New research has found that bicycle commuters inhale more than twice the amount of black carbon particles as pedestrians making a comparable trip. That healthy bike ride to and from work might be getting you out of a car, but it’s not getting you out of the way of the automobile emissions.

The study, led by Professor Jonathan Grigg from Barts and the London School of Medicine, looked at bicycle and pedestrian commuters in London to determine whether different modes of travel exposed commuters to higher levels of black carbon. By comparing levels of carbon in the lungs of five healthy bicycle commuters to the levels of five healthy pedestrian commuters, the researchers found a large disparity. The bicycle commuters had 2.3 times more black carbon in their lungs. They claim that the probability of this happening by chance is less than one percent.

Read more at The Atlantic Cities

Comments (View)
Tue Sep 20
newsweek:

discoverynews:

Suicide by Roller Coaster
This is a hypothetic euthanasia machine in the form of a roller coaster,  engineered to humanely – with elegance and euphoria – take the life of a  human being.

The 3-minute ride involves a long, slow, climb — nearly a third of a  mile long — that lifts one up to a height of more than 1,600 feet,  followed by a massive fall and seven strategically sized and placed  loops. The final descent and series of loops take all of one minute. But  the 10g force from the spinning loops at 223 mph in that single minute  is lethal.

More

This is nuts. The creator, Designer/Artist Julijonas Urbonas, tells Discovery he doesn’t see his suicide machine as being about death, but as “an intellectual and artful departure from the  world.”

newsweek:

discoverynews:

Suicide by Roller Coaster

This is a hypothetic euthanasia machine in the form of a roller coaster, engineered to humanely – with elegance and euphoria – take the life of a human being.

The 3-minute ride involves a long, slow, climb — nearly a third of a mile long — that lifts one up to a height of more than 1,600 feet, followed by a massive fall and seven strategically sized and placed loops. The final descent and series of loops take all of one minute. But the 10g force from the spinning loops at 223 mph in that single minute is lethal.

More

This is nuts. The creator, Designer/Artist Julijonas Urbonas, tells Discovery he doesn’t see his suicide machine as being about death, but as “an intellectual and artful departure from the world.”

Comments (View)
Sat Sep 3
newsweek:

thedailyfeed:

David Beckham warily eyed another beachgoer while body boarding in Malibu. Might we suggest these gentlemen switch suits? 

newsweek:

thedailyfeed:

David Beckham warily eyed another beachgoer while body boarding in Malibu. Might we suggest these gentlemen switch suits? 

Comments (View)
Fri Aug 26
I would probably have to say that reading fiction — those stories fill the space that other people might use religious stories for. The bulk of what I know about human life I’ve gotten from novels. And I think the thing about novels that make them important to the people who love them is that there’s always another perspective. Tom Perrotta, on the importance of fiction in his life. (via nprfreshair)

(via nprfreshair)

Comments (View)